Browse Interviews

  • Collection: Cedar Central
9 total

Carol Malone Interview, 6 February 2013

Carol Malone, a current Central resident, recalls her past growing up in Glenville and Shaker. She describes her family life and what predominantly African American neighborhoods were like at a young age and compares them to today. She describes businesses in the Central neighborhood, notably Roberts Bike Shop, the largest Black-owned Schwinn dealer in Ohio. Malone also discusses African Americans’ moves into Glenville (nicknamed the “Gold Coast”) and Shaker Heights.

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Carol Malone Interview, 25 February 2013

Carol Malone talks to a high school class about her past and present experiences as a Cleveland resident. The interview is more of a question and answer session with Malone and the students. Along with the students asking questions, Malone also gives them advice that she followed which helped her have a successful school career.

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Louis Gleason Interview, 25 February 2013

Louis Gleason attended the only Catholic Church (and the affiliated school) in Cleveland that welcomed people of any race. He attended John Carroll University before serving in the U.S. Air Force during the Berlin Airlift and the Korean War, returning to school, and finally working 24 years for the Roman Catholic Diocese of Cleveland until his retirement in 1995. He discusses how the Air Force recruiter assumed he was white because of his light skin. He discusses his experience of racism in the…

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James Lanese Interview, 25 February 2013

James Lanese discusses growing up in Lyndurst and attending private school in Cleveland. Lanese also shares information about his teaching career in a vocational program, and his involvement in the desegreation of Cleveland City Schools. This interview was led by Carol Malone with the assistance of her students, Markita, Angela, Thomas, Debreonya, Jamaal, and Kjimmy.

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Melvin Walker Interview, 25 February 2013

Melvin Walker was born in Cleveland in 1943 to parents from Mississippi. He moved to the Cedar-Central neighborhood in 1962. He shares memories of diving with friends at swimming pools around the city, black businesses including those in the "Gold Coast" of Glenville, and visits to Gleason's Musical Bar and Leo's Casino in his younger years. He shares that he worked 32 jobs and discusses some of them including being a postal worker. He comments that, even during the Hough uprising of 1966,…

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Frank Kidd Jr. Interview, 25 February 2013

Frank Kidd Jr., born in 1935, has lived in Cleveland his whole life. His parents were originally from the South (Alabama and Mississippi) but moved to Cleveland to seek refuge from harsh racism. Kidd lived most of his childhood with his grandmother, as his father served in the Army. He recalls many aspects of his childhood and teen years. Among the topics he discusses are Karamu House, restaurants in the Central neighborhood, and musical acts that played in Central nightspots. Kidd is a strong…

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Leroy Cowans Interview, 25 March 2013

Leroy Cowans moved from Columbus to Cleveland as a young child in the late 1930s, living first in the Central area and then in Glenville. During World War II, he lived in a foster home while his mother worked long hours in a factory. He discusses life on Cleveland’s east side in the 1940s-60s as well as the Glenville uprising of 1968.

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David Jolley Interview, 2 April 2013

David Jolley migrated with his parents from Georgia to Cleveland in 1944 and has lived in the Central neighborhood since 1954. He recalls stores and the Haltnorth Theater in the 55th-Woodland commercial district, high school sports rivalries, and the expansion of Black population to other neighborhoods.

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Carlyle Garner Interview, 30 April 2013

Carlyle Garner shares his memories of growing up in Central and talks about the types of businesses and places of entertainment he used to patronize while living in the neighborhood. He discusses the popularity of gambling and playing “the policy” in the neighborhood and attitudes of older African Americans toward Black nationalism.

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